April 7, 2014
"That sentence – that motivation for the report – may show deep, emotional feeling on the part of the senator, but I don’t think it leads you to an objective report."

Former CIA and NSA director Michael Hayden, on Sen. Diane Feinstein’s motivations behind the CIA interrogation report: to “ensure that an un-American, brutal program of detention and interrogation will never again be considered or permitted.” (via officialssay)

Because obviously, if you have any emotional feelings whatsoever, you’re not ‘objective’. And equally obviously, ‘objectivity’ is the most important thing in the world, above justice, mercy, or ethics.

What a piece of shit.

January 17, 2014
Overheard on my way to class:
Boy 1: So you're interested in politics, do you want to get involved, or change the world, or what?
Boy 2: *deadpan* I want to make a bunch of money.
Boy 1: Okay, Dick Cheney.
October 1, 2013
It seemed relevant.

It seemed relevant.

September 20, 2013
breakingnews:

US House votes to defund Obamacare, fund government
AP: The U.S. House passed a bill that temporarily funds the government but also defunds Obama’s health care law. 

The 230 -189 vote sets the stage for a confrontation with the Democratic-led Senate. The Senate promises to strip the “defund Obamacare” provision from the bill next week and will challenge the House to pass it as a straightforward funding bill that Obama will sign.

The House and Senate have to pass a funding bill by Sept. 30 in order to prevent a partial government shutdown. 
Follow updates on Breaking News.
Photo: Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, speaks with reporters about the looming deadline to fund the government and the fight among House Republicans on a strategy on Sept. 19, 2013, in Washington. 

I will not advocate revolution, it never works.
I will not advocate revolution, it never works.
I will not advocate revolution, it never works.
I will not advocate revolution, it never works.
I will not - fuck it. Who’s got pitchforks? I’ll bring the torches.

breakingnews:

US House votes to defund Obamacare, fund government

AP: The U.S. House passed a bill that temporarily funds the government but also defunds Obama’s health care law. 

The 230 -189 vote sets the stage for a confrontation with the Democratic-led Senate. The Senate promises to strip the “defund Obamacare” provision from the bill next week and will challenge the House to pass it as a straightforward funding bill that Obama will sign.

The House and Senate have to pass a funding bill by Sept. 30 in order to prevent a partial government shutdown. 

Follow updates on Breaking News.

Photo: Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, speaks with reporters about the looming deadline to fund the government and the fight among House Republicans on a strategy on Sept. 19, 2013, in Washington. 

I will not advocate revolution, it never works.

I will not advocate revolution, it never works.

I will not advocate revolution, it never works.

I will not advocate revolution, it never works.

I will not - fuck it. Who’s got pitchforks? I’ll bring the torches.

April 9, 2013
"

Imperialist Dogs:

You’ve witnessed only a taste of what is to come. Our threat to attack Austin, Texas resulted in a paroxysm of confusion and dismay as Rick Perry dominated your news cycle as planned. The spectacle of this ridiculous man jabbering nonsense about foreign policy surely chilled your spirit and made you doubt your strength.

Know this: Unless our demands are met, more Rick Perry will follow. We can issue spurious threats against Texan cities and inflict wave after wave of Rick Perry on you at will. He will appear on your major cable networks and on your Sunday talk shows. His awkward, idiot laughter and almost content-free posturing will fill your waking thoughts and haunt your dreams. If we wish, we will make Rick Perry relevant again. And if you do not cease your aggression, he will resurrect his presidential ambitions.

This is just the beginning. The glorious and unwavering people of the DPRK will systematically make ridiculous noises about launching attacks against the home districts of your most obnoxious and ignorant politicians. You will see your Congress grind to a halt so that Michele Bachmann can engage in a two-hour carnival of factual errors, conspiracy theories, and white lady crazy-eye. You will witness Sarah Palin’s return to power. And then your celebrities will get involved. Do you really want to see the press conference that follows a tossed-off assassination threat against Taylor Swift? Or Lindsay Lohan? Do you want to finally hear the horrifying things I told Dennis Rodman, when he writes a policy paper in Foreign Affairs?

The US lacks the ability to separate real threats from fake threats. American politicians and news people are incapable of keeping any kind of danger, no matter how small, in its proper perspective. Yours is a people addicted to crisis and hysteria. We know this, because everyone knows this. And until you change, we will weaponize your ridiculous public figures and turn them against you.

How bad can this get? I will bring Tucker Carlson back from the dead, and I will put him on every screen in America.

You have been warned.

"

— Paul Bibeau, "I Will Unleash A Wave Of Rick Perry" by Kim Jong-un

February 11, 2013
"

Me? Oh, don’t worry about me. I’m just a few pieces of skull. I think there’s a bit of tibia over there by the scorch marks, but I can’t be certain. You don’t know my name. You don’t know how old I am. You don’t know where this happened. Why start asking questions now?…

I will say this, and then we’ll move on: Somebody knows my name. There are people out there who are crying and enraged, and they don’t care what your reasons were. God, what if I were a kid? Ugh. That’s just wrong. Anyway, they’re probably putting it on some crap-bag TV channel in a country whose name you can’t pronounce. There are probably plenty of people who are going to remember this for a long time. They will make a plan.

That’s, of course, what happens. You guys do something, and then just walk away, and they don’t even teach it in your schools. The administration’s drone program is a kind of anti-education initiative. A way of keeping you from learning your own history. Believe me, it’s been done before. So it’s left to the locals in a thousand foreign places to keep the record. To keep score.

Then one bright, beautiful morning, you’ll learn who I was.

"

— Paul Bibeau, a message from some bone fragments in a place you’ve never heard of

January 13, 2013
mehreenkasana:

Irfan Ali, a Pakistani activist who was killed on Thursday in a bombing, addressed a rally against sectarian attacks in September in Islamabad. [Photo via Ghalib Khalil]
Writing this has not been easy.
More than a 100 killed in two cities in a single day. Innocent Pakistani civilians, journalists, rescuers and police officers. The victims predominantly belong to the Hazara community and, by extension, the Shia population of Balochistan. One of the most relentlessly attacked targets of Sunni extremists, the Hazara community has suffered for the past 11 years and continues to find very little support from the authorities of Pakistan. Verbal condemnation is issued day in and day out but practically nothing has been done by the State to ensure the protection of the massively assailed minority. For perspective, it is important to remember that the persecution of the Hazara community is not a predicament native to Pakistan only; its complicated and gory history is linked back to Afghanistan. Some argue that the basis of the strife was a product of ethnic rivalry while others maintain that this is only another violent manifestation of Sunni extremism against a non-Sunni sect. The 18th century is noted to be one of the most oppressive periods pertaining to the bloody subjugation of the Hazara community under Amir Abdur Rehman Khan in Afghanistan; His rule resulted in the mass exodus of the Hazara people into present-day Quetta (Pakistan) and Mashad (Iran). Now in 2012, in Pakistan, over 900,000 Hazara live in the country - mostly in the southwestern province of Balochistan where the population is largely Shia. Touted as “heretics” by Pakistani extremist Sunni militants, the Hazara community of Pakistan remains under siege as victims of ethnic and, more obviously, sectarian violence. 375 Pakistani Shia Muslims have died in 2012 — the worst toll since the 1990s, human rights activists claim. With only eleven days into 2013, the future doesn’t seem too different for the Hazara of Pakistan.
But this is only a brief glimpse in the chaos that rattles Balochistan in specific and Pakistan in general. I want to talk about our selective outrage as Pakistanis. And before anyone objects, let it be known that I, too, am a Pakistani Muslim. This is only a plea, a request that we, as Pakistanis, look into ourselves.
I find US drone strikes deplorable; Anyone arguing in favor of missiles to “correct” the situation in Pakistan is dangerously mistaken because the performance of the Taliban and Al-Qaeda remains unaffected by these “precise” and “surgical” strikes. If anything, these strikes have helped militants in recruiting more members for revenge. I find Western Imperialism disgusting. It goes without saying that the colonial and imperial powers of the West have destroyed the lives of countless human beings. I find Whiteness despicable; A social construct to silence and trivialize people of color is something no decent human being would concur with. At the same time, I find it extremely important for social growth that I criticize what is native to my country. I see very little of it coming from Pakistanis - living within the land or abroad, it rarely matters. I find the Pakistani military and intelligence agencies’ aggression and abuse of human rights unacceptable. For me, the disproportionate manipulation of religion and power by the State is reprehensible. I view the gross consumption of resources, aid, labor force and more by the Elite of Pakistan horrendous and pathetic. I have learned - with much unease and dismay - that we, as a people, will quickly run to the help of those oppressed outside of our borders. Which is not to say that transnational solidarity is wrong; Raising our voice and searching our pockets to help those under tyranny is something Pakistanis will never think twice before doing. We care, as a people, we truly care. But sometimes - and this is where my disappointment stems from as a citizen - our priorities are misguided. The debate whether this is because we have gradually become numb as a nation is an entirely separate one. Our home is on fire and our gaze is averted.
Let us understand two facts: Firstly, tyranny is Janus-faced. Secondly, the State cannot write these crimes under our names.
Power operates in various forms. USA remains, undoubtedly so, one of the top abusers of human rights and international laws. There is no questioning it. But that does not mean our criticism, as Pakistanis, of our local corrupt and complicit government(s) should soften. Our intelligence agencies assisted extremist factions like LeJ - Lashkar e Jhangvi, the same that attacked our fellow citizens yesterday, now closely allied with the Taliban - and later on the Government of Pakistan “banned” them but never really got to practically ceasing their operations. Sometimes - knowingly or not - we pick sides. Humeira Iqtidar deconstructs this fallacy of ‘picking sides’; Do we form an alliance with Imperialism against homegrown madness or do we support homegrown madness against Imperialism? Iqtidar denounces both and firmly asserts that Pakistanis can reject both forms of megalomania. This refusal to align with both forms of tyranny is essential to our progress and safety as Pakistanis - regardless of our religious, ethnic, social differences. We can reject external cruelty in the same way we can reject state-sanctioned brutality. Our selective outrage only weakens us. In many cases, it is our silence that kills us and our loved ones.
Furthermore, we must not allow our debauched, bribable and treacherous Government pass these atrocities off as incidents ‘normalized’ by us. We do not support the genocide of Shia Pakistanis or Shia Muslims or any minority anywhere. Our silence must not be appropriated by these groups and parallel states. Tomorrow I leave with my friends to protest against the attacks at Liberty Chowk in Lahore at 5PM. Our demand is simple: Arrest the killers, empower the oppressed. My pessimism tells me the State will remain unfazed - like it has all this time. My optimism tells me our unity will grow in numbers and in strength, and one day we will save our home from burning to the ground, our gaze will focus on what weakens our core.
There is hope. I see it in you all.

mehreenkasana:

Irfan Ali, a Pakistani activist who was killed on Thursday in a bombing, addressed a rally against sectarian attacks in September in Islamabad. [Photo via Ghalib Khalil]

Writing this has not been easy.

More than a 100 killed in two cities in a single day. Innocent Pakistani civilians, journalists, rescuers and police officers. The victims predominantly belong to the Hazara community and, by extension, the Shia population of Balochistan. One of the most relentlessly attacked targets of Sunni extremists, the Hazara community has suffered for the past 11 years and continues to find very little support from the authorities of Pakistan. Verbal condemnation is issued day in and day out but practically nothing has been done by the State to ensure the protection of the massively assailed minority. For perspective, it is important to remember that the persecution of the Hazara community is not a predicament native to Pakistan only; its complicated and gory history is linked back to Afghanistan. Some argue that the basis of the strife was a product of ethnic rivalry while others maintain that this is only another violent manifestation of Sunni extremism against a non-Sunni sect. The 18th century is noted to be one of the most oppressive periods pertaining to the bloody subjugation of the Hazara community under Amir Abdur Rehman Khan in Afghanistan; His rule resulted in the mass exodus of the Hazara people into present-day Quetta (Pakistan) and Mashad (Iran). Now in 2012, in Pakistan, over 900,000 Hazara live in the country - mostly in the southwestern province of Balochistan where the population is largely Shia. Touted as “heretics” by Pakistani extremist Sunni militants, the Hazara community of Pakistan remains under siege as victims of ethnic and, more obviously, sectarian violence. 375 Pakistani Shia Muslims have died in 2012 — the worst toll since the 1990s, human rights activists claim. With only eleven days into 2013, the future doesn’t seem too different for the Hazara of Pakistan.

But this is only a brief glimpse in the chaos that rattles Balochistan in specific and Pakistan in general. I want to talk about our selective outrage as Pakistanis. And before anyone objects, let it be known that I, too, am a Pakistani Muslim. This is only a plea, a request that we, as Pakistanis, look into ourselves.

I find US drone strikes deplorable; Anyone arguing in favor of missiles to “correct” the situation in Pakistan is dangerously mistaken because the performance of the Taliban and Al-Qaeda remains unaffected by these “precise” and “surgical” strikes. If anything, these strikes have helped militants in recruiting more members for revenge. I find Western Imperialism disgusting. It goes without saying that the colonial and imperial powers of the West have destroyed the lives of countless human beings. I find Whiteness despicable; A social construct to silence and trivialize people of color is something no decent human being would concur with. At the same time, I find it extremely important for social growth that I criticize what is native to my country. I see very little of it coming from Pakistanis - living within the land or abroad, it rarely matters. I find the Pakistani military and intelligence agencies’ aggression and abuse of human rights unacceptable. For me, the disproportionate manipulation of religion and power by the State is reprehensible. I view the gross consumption of resources, aid, labor force and more by the Elite of Pakistan horrendous and pathetic. I have learned - with much unease and dismay - that we, as a people, will quickly run to the help of those oppressed outside of our borders. Which is not to say that transnational solidarity is wrong; Raising our voice and searching our pockets to help those under tyranny is something Pakistanis will never think twice before doing. We care, as a people, we truly care. But sometimes - and this is where my disappointment stems from as a citizen - our priorities are misguided. The debate whether this is because we have gradually become numb as a nation is an entirely separate one. Our home is on fire and our gaze is averted.

Let us understand two facts: Firstly, tyranny is Janus-faced. Secondly, the State cannot write these crimes under our names.

Power operates in various forms. USA remains, undoubtedly so, one of the top abusers of human rights and international laws. There is no questioning it. But that does not mean our criticism, as Pakistanis, of our local corrupt and complicit government(s) should soften. Our intelligence agencies assisted extremist factions like LeJ - Lashkar e Jhangvi, the same that attacked our fellow citizens yesterday, now closely allied with the Taliban - and later on the Government of Pakistan “banned” them but never really got to practically ceasing their operations. Sometimes - knowingly or not - we pick sides. Humeira Iqtidar deconstructs this fallacy of ‘picking sides’; Do we form an alliance with Imperialism against homegrown madness or do we support homegrown madness against Imperialism? Iqtidar denounces both and firmly asserts that Pakistanis can reject both forms of megalomania. This refusal to align with both forms of tyranny is essential to our progress and safety as Pakistanis - regardless of our religious, ethnic, social differences. We can reject external cruelty in the same way we can reject state-sanctioned brutality. Our selective outrage only weakens us. In many cases, it is our silence that kills us and our loved ones.

Furthermore, we must not allow our debauched, bribable and treacherous Government pass these atrocities off as incidents ‘normalized’ by us. We do not support the genocide of Shia Pakistanis or Shia Muslims or any minority anywhere. Our silence must not be appropriated by these groups and parallel states. Tomorrow I leave with my friends to protest against the attacks at Liberty Chowk in Lahore at 5PM. Our demand is simple: Arrest the killers, empower the oppressed. My pessimism tells me the State will remain unfazed - like it has all this time. My optimism tells me our unity will grow in numbers and in strength, and one day we will save our home from burning to the ground, our gaze will focus on what weakens our core.

There is hope. I see it in you all.

(via daggerpen)

December 27, 2012
"Last Tuesday, the Senate quietly altered a key privacy law, making it much easier for video streaming services like Netflix to share your viewing habits."

— Oh. Wonderful. (via motherjones)

December 18, 2012

rhubarbchristmaspie:

If you have not heard of the Idle No More movement, there is a reason. Prime minister Harper has placed a blackout media ban on reporting on the subject. No mainstream media is being given permission to publish any information on the Indigenous Revolution. And all the while Chief Theresa Spence and her supporters are staying in a tipi on parliament hill on their 7th day of a hunger strike waiting for Harper and the governor general to agree to a meeting. 

If you are not with us, you are against us. If Chief Theresa Spence dies without a meeting, the First Nations of Canada will go to war. You get respect when you give it Canada, and you’ve been withholding it for 500 years.

(via daggerpen)

November 12, 2012
"

I know a kid from a tribal area that bikes several miles a day to go to school in Sana’a. His family have had drone aircraft hover over their homes. One day they could step in the capital city and come home to see their entire world shattered (literally) or worse a drone could strike their home while they’re inside. The only thing worse than instantly being killed is sustaining horrific injuries without any medical facilities nearby and succumbing to a slow, painful death. This is the sad reality that many Yemenis in the rural areas are forced to endure.

When we say we hate America, we don’t mean individual citizens. I wish Americans would step outside of their narcissism for a second to understand that the term ‘America’ is applied in a political sense here. We don’t wish harm on American people, because ultimately they’re not the ones responsible for what were forced to go through. We mean the imperialism, the militarism, the warfare that’s attached to America, the forced destabilization of our country, the dwindling economy, the rampant distrust of the West which therein festers into a vulnerability that’s turned most of these newer ‘militants’ onto the idea of terrorism. It’s a vicious cycle, you see. The more innocent people killed, the increase in extremist activity, which justifies even more drone strikes and it eventually will snowball into unforeseen chaos.

Of course the individual American isn’t responsible for this, but citizens of the U.S. need to understand that it’s their tax dollars that fund this weaponry. It’s their supposed protection that’s being protected at the cost of our lives, livelihoods, stability and economical comfort. Whether or not Americans like, they are inevitably a part of this killing machine and not directly lobbying, protesting and holding their government accountable is complicity. It’s the allowance of our deaths.

"

An excerpt from an email that my cousin Haseem sent me yesterday, upon hearing of Obama’s re-election.

How proud I am to call this kid my family. He’s so eloquent and well written.

(via eastafrodite)

(Source: maarnayeri, via daggerpen)

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